Wednesday, March 07, 2007

 

Random Repstrap Idea

Previously, Jim posted a blog about how he fabricated the extruder parts by hand. it made me wonder if it would be possible to use a printer to help the process.

simply print your design on a sheet of paper, attach it to the board you intend to cut, the cut where it indicates on the paper. if you glue it on somehow, then you're set!

although with vik's recent success with fabricating extruder head parts... hopefully we can start getting them printed and in the wild ;)

~Zach

Comments:
Still, the more parts that can be made without having to ask for someone to make you one means that you are going to spread the technology that much faster.
 
//if you glue it on somehow, then you're set//

You can get full-sheet labels that would be ideal for this. Print the design, peel off the backing and stick it on the workpiece.
 
that ain't something like an laminated object manufacturing?

http://www.efunda.com/processes/rapid_prototyping/lom.cfm

A 3D printer wich produces another forms of RP, nice :D

See ya! []'s
 
Cool idea but how do we print a full size print out with AOI??
 
Without having investigated this in any way, I would guess you could get very accurate prints from AOI by using a method I've used in the past with similiar 3D software.

First, render or screen capture the parts in AOI or other 3D software. Then export this image file into an image editing application like Photoshop or Paint Shop. Use the measuring tools in those applications to size the image via scaling, or via the print settings. Then print and double check with a good ruler.

Once you've got it set up, you should be able to do several prints of assorted parts without much hassle.

I like the full sheet lable idea! :)
 
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Okay I took a quick look, seems there is a grid function in AOI, it's in the Scene menu. Its very basic, but it can help.

When you have the AOI image in the image editing software, you can also activate a grid and then when they both overlap perfectly you should have accurate control of demensions from then on. :)
 
This comment has been removed by the author.
 
This is a good idea.

It wouldn't be hard to do 1:1 plans to be glued on a sheets of MDF board that would then be carefully cut.

The question is:
What is the best and simplest design for a repstrap.

Darwin is quite simple but is it easy to make it with low fi technology? Maybe. The advantage using the darwin design from the start is clear however.

There are other simple designs for cnc like this one by
Will O'Brien.
http://www.engadget.com/2006/06/29/how-to-build-your-own-cnc-machine-part-1/

or these by
John Klinbauer.
http://www.crankorgan.com/

If we choose to go the Darwin way, i will be glad to provide the plans for it.
 
zach can we get section in the forums for repstrap
 
darwin might be the way to go but we need cad drawings so they can easly be created with hand tools.
 
This comment has been removed by the author.
 
Bruce, i've the 3D cad files for Darwin.

I've the ability to do them so i'll make the cad drawing.

I will try to simplify the parts to make them easily done on a drill press and a bandsaw.
 
that is great. I have been looking at making one like your last post. but now I will wait. and it now looks like I need to buy a drill press. I have a scroll saw. i wonder if a jig can be made for all of the corner blocks that are on Darwin?
 
Here's a proof of concept.

http://bf5man.googlepages.com/a001.pdf

Tell me what you think of it, what could be improved or anything else.

I made a new topic on the forum for this too.
 
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